Embroidered Flowers From left to right: Suno, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Zac Posen, Erdem and Jonathan Saunders. Photos: Courtesy From left to right: Suno, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Zac Posen, Erdem and Jonathan Saunders. Photos: Courtesy It's hard to imagine resort without flowers, and don't worry, they were everywhere. Our favorite renditions were embroidered selectively on garments and with lots of color. | 716739

Embroidered Flowers
From left to right: Suno, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Zac Posen, Erdem and Jonathan Saunders. Photos: Courtesy
From left to right: Suno, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Zac Posen, Erdem and Jonathan Saunders. Photos: Courtesy

It's hard to imagine resort without flowers, and don't worry, they were everywhere. Our favorite renditions were embroidered selectively on garments and with lots of color.

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Mod From left to right: Just Cavalli, Lanvin, Lisa Perry, Organic by John Patrick and Sonia by Sonia Rykiel. Photos: Courtesy An off-shoot of the ever-popular white polo necks of fall 2015, it's inevitable that the mid-season collections, known for being a bit more conservative and dressed down, run with it right into the '60s. There's something to be said for a little simplicity. | 716742

Mod

From left to right: Just Cavalli, Lanvin, Lisa Perry, Organic by John Patrick and Sonia by Sonia Rykiel. Photos: Courtesy

An off-shoot of the ever-popular white polo necks of fall 2015, it's inevitable that the mid-season collections, known for being a bit more conservative and dressed down, run with it right into the '60s. There's something to be said for a little simplicity.

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Global Trends in Beauty and Personal Care Surfactants Surfactants are an important ingredient in many beauty and personal care products, and to this end have maintained steady growth worldwide. However, the market in Western regions is very weak and in developing regions demand is dampened. There is still growth potential in many countries and in specialist applications. Market trends, including mildness, are having an impact on surfactants, but efficacy is still key. These trends and opportunities for the industry are discussed in this report. Continued good growth potential in Asia Pacific and Latin America Despite weaker growth than in the past, there remains good growth potential in Asia Pacific and Latin America. China is the largest market for surfactants used in BPC, ahead of India and Brazil, and this will remain so in 2018. Opportunities for growth in specialist categories Western regions are forecast weak growth in surfactants in BPC, but there is still growth to be found in specialist categories. These include men’s grooming and baby and child-specific products. Efficacy overrides other consumer requirements Effectiveness is a key purchase driver in BPC. Therefore, where other ingredients are being rejected because there are concerns among some consumers over their toxicological impact, some key surfactants are still widely used because they are effective. Mild surfactants in demand across BPC Mildness is a key trend in bath and shower and hair care. Surfactants that meet this trend, but are also effective, are being used in formulations at the expense of more harsh ingredients. Urbanisation fuels growth in BPC The growing urban population, particularly in developing countries, is helping to fuel the growth in BPC. As more people work in office and retail environments, awareness of personal appearance and hygiene is increasing the frequency of use of BPC products. Decline in traditional bar soap creates demand for other surfactants As consumers? incomes increase and there is a move to urban locations in developing countries, more are switching from traditional bar soap to liquid products, including liquid soap and shower gel. This is changing surfactant requirements in these countries. http://www.euromonitor.com/global-trends-in-beauty-and-personal-care-surfactants/report | 716729

Global Trends in Beauty and Personal Care Surfactants

Surfactants are an important ingredient in many beauty and personal care products, and to this end have maintained steady growth worldwide. However, the market in Western regions is very weak and in developing regions demand is dampened. There is still growth potential in many countries and in specialist applications. Market trends, including mildness, are having an impact on surfactants, but efficacy is still key. These trends and opportunities for the industry are discussed in this report.

Continued good growth potential in Asia Pacific and Latin America

Despite weaker growth than in the past, there remains good growth potential in Asia Pacific and Latin America. China is the largest market for surfactants used in BPC, ahead of India and Brazil, and this will remain so in 2018.
Opportunities for growth in specialist categories

Western regions are forecast weak growth in surfactants in BPC, but there is still growth to be found in specialist categories. These include men’s grooming and baby and child-specific products.
Efficacy overrides other consumer requirements

Effectiveness is a key purchase driver in BPC. Therefore, where other ingredients are being rejected because there are concerns among some consumers over their toxicological impact, some key surfactants are still widely used because they are effective.
Mild surfactants in demand across BPC

Mildness is a key trend in bath and shower and hair care. Surfactants that meet this trend, but are also effective, are being used in formulations at the expense of more harsh ingredients.
Urbanisation fuels growth in BPC

The growing urban population, particularly in developing countries, is helping to fuel the growth in BPC. As more people work in office and retail environments, awareness of personal appearance and hygiene is increasing the frequency of use of BPC products.
Decline in traditional bar soap creates demand for other surfactants

As consumers? incomes increase and there is a move to urban locations in developing countries, more are switching from traditional bar soap to liquid products, including liquid soap and shower gel. This is changing surfactant requirements in these countries.

http://www.euromonitor.com/global-trends-in-beauty-and-personal-care-surfactants/report

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Bell Curve From left to right: Zac Posen, Thakoon, Suno, Calvin Klein and Stella McCartney. Photos: Courtesy The bell shape harkens all the way back to the fluid silhouettes of the '20s and '30s, though there's nothing retro about how designers like Calvin Klein, Thakoon or Suno are utilizing it this season. They're keeping it slim with body-hugging tunics and skirts flared flirtatiously at the hem. | 716735

Bell Curve

From left to right: Zac Posen, Thakoon, Suno, Calvin Klein and Stella McCartney. Photos: Courtesy

The bell shape harkens all the way back to the fluid silhouettes of the '20s and '30s, though there's nothing retro about how designers like Calvin Klein, Thakoon or Suno are utilizing it this season. They're keeping it slim with body-hugging tunics and skirts flared flirtatiously at the hem.

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The Fixer: Here's How to Salvage Your Favorite Jeans By Tracey Lomrantz Lester September 3, 2015 As all jean queens well know, fit-to-perfection skinnies or a pair of this-minute flares are a wardrobe must—you wear them with tailored blazers, with slinky little sequined tops, with cozy sweaters and straight-outta-Tar-zhay white cotton tanks. You wear them so much, in fact, that the once-impeccable hems betray your disproportionate love of said jeans, becoming frayed enough to ruin your killer look. So what's a girl to do? Don't worry: You don't need to break in a brand-new pair all over again. You just need a little therapy! In the same way a good shrink can help you identify your issues and zero in on a solution, the board-certified geniuses at Denim Therapy can do the same for your favorite blues. “For simple fraying around the hem, we can always clean that up by cutting away the excess strands or even rehemming,” founder Francine Rabinovich tells us. "If you've got a major tear on or above the hem, typically from stepping on the back of your jeans, then it's probably advisable to simply hem them shorter, which is a really inexpensive fix and will leave your jeans looking like new again." Want to preserve the exact same look so your heels jeans don't suddenly become strictly flats jeans? "If you'd like to keep the length and freshen the look, we can use a darning process to re-create material where there may be a rip or hole," Rabinovich says. "We blend and weave into the denim with 100 percent cotton threads, matching color as closely as possible." The results are pretty mind-blowing, and the process couldn't be simpler. Just register with the site, follow the instructions to mail in your jeans, wait for an estimate via email, and receive the remade pair in two to three weeks. Prices range from $18 for a regular hem up to $9 per inch for total hem reconstruction. Have a harrowing style dilemma? It’s no match for the Fixer, always on call: Tweet your dilemma to @glamour_fashion with the hashtag #thefixer. source : http://www.glamour.com/fashion/blogs/dressed/2015/09/the-fixer-salvage-your-favorit | 716664

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The Fixer: Here's How to Salvage Your Favorite Jeans
By Tracey Lomrantz Lester September 3, 2015

As all jean queens well know, fit-to-perfection skinnies or a pair of this-minute flares are a wardrobe must—you wear them with tailored blazers, with slinky little sequined tops, with cozy sweaters and straight-outta-Tar-zhay white cotton tanks. You wear them so much, in fact, that the once-impeccable hems betray your disproportionate love of said jeans, becoming frayed enough to ruin your killer look. So what's a girl to do?

Don't worry: You don't need to break in a brand-new pair all over again. You just need a little therapy! In the same way a good shrink can help you identify your issues and zero in on a solution, the board-certified geniuses at Denim Therapy can do the same for your favorite blues.

“For simple fraying around the hem, we can always clean that up by cutting away the excess strands or even rehemming,” founder Francine Rabinovich tells us. "If you've got a major tear on or above the hem, typically from stepping on the back of your jeans, then it's probably advisable to simply hem them shorter, which is a really inexpensive fix and will leave your jeans looking like new again."

Want to preserve the exact same look so your heels jeans don't suddenly become strictly flats jeans? "If you'd like to keep the length and freshen the look, we can use a darning process to re-create material where there may be a rip or hole," Rabinovich says. "We blend and weave into the denim with 100 percent cotton threads, matching color as closely as possible."

The results are pretty mind-blowing, and the process couldn't be simpler. Just register with the site, follow the instructions to mail in your jeans, wait for an estimate via email, and receive the remade pair in two to three weeks. Prices range from $18 for a regular hem up to $9 per inch for total hem reconstruction.

Have a harrowing style dilemma? It’s no match for the Fixer, always on call: Tweet your dilemma to @glamour_fashion with the hashtag #thefixer.

source : http://www.glamour.com/fashion/blogs/dressed/2015/09/the-fixer-salvage-your-favorit

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This Early 1900s Trend Is Bringing Sexy Back by Annie Georgia Greenberg It's true what you heard: Fashion is cyclical. (Bell-bottoms — check. Fringe — check. Structured shoulders — check.) But it can take a while for things to come back around again. We're talking a good century, sometimes. Yes, while we readily anticipate some details to return after a certain period of time (some say 25 years is the sweet spot), we were surprised to see an Edwardian-era trend pop up on yesterday's Zimmermann runway. The Spring '16 collection was romantic and ornate, but carefree in its frilliness, as Zimmermann is wont to do. It also previewed a high, ruffled neckline (from the early 1900s) that we're banking on coming back next season. Only difference is, this time the frocks and tops are bringing hemlines way, way up, too. What the ruched and pleated numbers lacked in length, they made up for in height. We'll call this fabric compensation at its best. Lookin' good for your age, neck ruffles! source : http://www.refinery29.com/2015/09/93886/zimmermann-high-neck-dresses-spring-16-runway-show#slide | 716665


This Early 1900s Trend Is Bringing Sexy Back

by  Annie Georgia Greenberg

It's true what you heard: Fashion is cyclical. (Bell-bottoms — check. Fringe — check. Structured shoulders — check.) But it can take a while for things to come back around again. We're talking a good century, sometimes. Yes, while we readily anticipate some details to return after a certain period of time (some say 25 years is the sweet spot), we were surprised to see an Edwardian-era trend pop up on yesterday's Zimmermann runway.

The Spring '16 collection was romantic and ornate, but carefree in its frilliness, as Zimmermann is wont to do. It also previewed a high, ruffled neckline (from the early 1900s) that we're banking on coming back next season. Only difference is, this time the frocks and tops are bringing hemlines way, way up, too. What the ruched and pleated numbers lacked in length, they made up for in height. We'll call this fabric compensation at its best. Lookin' good for your age, neck ruffles!

source : http://www.refinery29.com/2015/09/93886/zimmermann-high-neck-dresses-spring-16-runway-show#slide

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